AdorkableVan


Weird and wonderful.

Ask me anything
eretzyisrael:

Braiding challah

eretzyisrael:

Braiding challah


and the prize for the least convincing alien beast goes tooo…..

and the prize for the least convincing alien beast goes tooo…..

Source: sorenandjoey

passiveimagination:

My mom teaches Kindergarten and I went to her classroom a few days ago and saw what appeared to be a small shrine dedicated to Jodie Foster in the corner of the room and I had literally no idea why it was there, so I asked my mom about it and she said it’s where the kids can go to tattle on each other so they don’t always do it to her

So basically my mom tells her little Kindergarteners to tell on each other to a magazine clipping of Jodie Foster that they call Miss Tattle and if you don’t think that’s the funniest thing then get out of my face

lebomashile:

Lebo Mashile Youth Village interview

lebomashile:

Lebo Mashile Youth Village interview

bettyraevintage:

Fifties Flashback: The Beat Generation

“Great things are not accomplished by those who yield to trends and fads and popular opinion.” – Jack Kerouac.

The Beat Generation was a revolutionary counterculture movement formed in the late 1940s and which then transpired as a mainstream symbol of youth and rebellion during the 1950s.

Founded by a group of subversive and intellectual poets and writers, the original ‘Beats’ included the likes of Allen Ginsberg, William S. Burroughs and the now iconic Jack Kerouac. Kerouac himself coined the movement’s name ‘beat’ to mean a non-conformist group of tired, warn-out youths; exhausted by war, oppression and social expectations. The Beats were, for want of a better word, the original hippies.

The origin of the movement started primarily in Greenwich Village, New York, with the members meeting in bars and coffee shops to discuss art, poetry, literature, society and sexuality. This young group of bohemians were recovering from the devastation of WW2 and were very much uninspired by the standard American expectations of working a 9-5, getting married, having a mortgage and raising children. They wanted more from life. They wanted to travel, experiment with drugs and sexuality, to study Eastern religions, write, paint and most of all; to be free.

By 1955, the movement had advanced to other areas of the U.S such as Washington D.C and San Francisco. The Beats had gained wide-spread popularity through their writings, most of which was considered subversive and controversial for its time. The founding members often toured the U.S and Mexico performing readings of their work to students and fellow bohemians. Kerouac, Ginsberg and Burroughs never particularly set out to form a social revolution, they themselves just wanted to live by their own accord and liberate themselves. They considered themselves as outsiders, but soon came to realise that their progressive desires were quietly gnawing away in the minds of many young Americans.

Although laced with controversy and often dubbed communists and radicals, the movement coursed rapidly through the veins of popular culture, heavily-influencing the rising Rock N Roll stars of the 1950s such as Elvis Presley, and later Buddy Holly and The Beatles. The misspelling of the latter’s name being no coincidence.

The Beats are widely credited with being the quiet rebels who gave birth to the 1960s cultural revolution, which expanded so diversely into other areas such as music, cinema and most importantly, political shifts such as the Civil Rights and the Feminist Movements.

Post-Beat youths of the last four generations who believe in artistic expression, human rights, liberation, freedom of speech, equality and individualism owe it all the Beat Generation.

©clarataylor2013

Stubbornness gets you through the bad times. You don’t give in.
— Patricia Neal (via fuckyesoldhollywood)

smalltownbeatnik:

A street map made up of over 900 film titles including cinema classics such as Lost Highway, On the Waterfront, Jurassic Park, Reservoir Dogs, Carlito’s Way, Nightmare on Elm Street, Valley of the Dolls and Chinatown.

Loosely based on the style of a vintage Los Angeles street map, it has its own Hollywood Boulevard and includes districts dedicated to Hitchcock and Cult British Horror movies. Like most cities it also has its own Red Light area. 

You can buy it from WeAreDorothy.

[x]

historiful:


“Do not be so bloody vulnerable. To hell with God damned “L’Amour.” It always causes far more trouble than it is worth. Don’t run after it. Don’t court it. Keep it waiting off stage until you’re good and ready for it and even then treat it with the suspicious disdain that it deserves […] I am sick to death of you waiting about in empty houses and apartments with your ears strained for the telephone to ring. Snap out of it, girl! [Living] does not consist of staring in at other people’s windows and waiting for crumbs to be thrown to you. You’ve carried on this hole in corner, overcharged, romantic, unrealistic nonsense long enough…”
-Noël Coward, in a letter to Marlene Dietrich, c. 1956.

Actress Marlene Dietrich (1901-1992), in Morocco, 1930. 

historiful:

Do not be so bloody vulnerable. To hell with God damned “L’Amour.” It always causes far more trouble than it is worth. Don’t run after it. Don’t court it. Keep it waiting off stage until you’re good and ready for it and even then treat it with the suspicious disdain that it deserves […] I am sick to death of you waiting about in empty houses and apartments with your ears strained for the telephone to ring. Snap out of it, girl! [Living] does not consist of staring in at other people’s windows and waiting for crumbs to be thrown to you. You’ve carried on this hole in corner, overcharged, romantic, unrealistic nonsense long enough…”

-Noël Coward, in a letter to Marlene Dietrich, c. 1956.

Actress Marlene Dietrich (1901-1992), in Morocco, 1930. 

angle-of-depression:

nothingcorporate:

opinions on abortions are kinda like nipples

everyone has them but women’s are a little bit more relevant 

But all you ever see are men’s

Source: uncooler

hayworths:

The Fearless Vampire Killers (1967)

hayworths:

The Fearless Vampire Killers (1967)